St. Joseph Church
New Kensington, Pennsylvania

A Pennsylvania Charitable Trust
A Parish of the Diocese of Greensburg


The Reverend Richard P. Karenbauer             The Reverend Alan W. Grote
         Pastor
                                                Parochial Vicar

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Images of St. Joseph


The Vision of St. Joseph
Philippe deChampaigne
1642-43

 

 


The Dream of St Joseph
Rembrandt
1650-55

            This picture is a reference to the dream in which St Joseph was warned by an angel to flee into Egypt so that Jesus might escape the Massacre of the Innocents. The Holy family is shown resting in a dim stable; Mary is protected from the cold by a large shawl which she has also folded round the Infant on her lap so that only his tiny face is visible. Joseph, depicted as a clumsy Dutch peasant, is seen awakening from the sleep of exhaustion, dazed by a brilliant apparition which puts a hand on his shoulder as a sign of heavenly comfort, support and encouragement for the weak. The angel is the source of the warm golden light suffusing the whole group.


Icon of St. Joseph

            This icon depicts St. Joseph with the infant Jesus on the day of the Child’s presentation in the Temple at Jerusalem. By Jewish law, a mother was required to bring an offering to the Temple and be purified forty days after giving birth. The normal offering was a sheep but a poor family, like Joseph’s, was allowed to bring a pair of doves instead. Behind Jesus is the cave of Bethlehem. Above Joseph’s other shoulder is the Temple and the city of Jerusalem. While the doves are to be offered this day, on Jesus’ final day in Jerusalem he himself will be the sacrifice.

            Departing from strict Byzantine iconography Joseph is here shown as middle-aged rather than as an old man with white hair. Today as we struggle with issues of affection it is important to recognize a child’s need for a tender and loving father-figure. Like any child would, Jesus was guided and nourished by the love and example of His father.

            The Greek inscription in the upper corners of the icon reads, “St. Joseph of Nazareth.” The Greek letters next to Jesus’ halo are abbreviations for, “Jesus Christ,” and the letters inside His halo are the divine name revealed to Moses: “I am Who am.”


St. Joseph the Worker
Pietro Annigoni
1963

 

 

 


The Holy Family
Raphaella Blanc

 

 

 


The Annunciation of St. Joseph
Luca Giordano

 


 


The Holy Spouses
Fr. Franco Verri, C.S.J.

 

 

 


Death of St. Joseph
Fr. Franco Verri, C.S.J.

 

 



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